Christians and Fantasy

'Lo,


Fantasy. It's a touchy subject among plenty of Christians.

Lots of my friends are not allowed to read Harry Potter or watch movies having to do with fantasy. Their parents are guiding them in what they believe is right. And that's good, okay? I'm not going to call you out for what you believe in.

But here's the thing-there's nothing wrong with liking to read and watch things having to do with other worlds, magic, or magical beings-if you deal with them the right way.


I'm Christian, a practicing Catholic specifically. I like Tim Burton movies, I read such books as Harry Potter, Coraline, and those darker fairy tales-the real ones. I like watching TV shows about sarcastic alien dudes that time travel. I write fantasy as I'm sure you know.
I also like to read dark fantasy.

But what is dark fantasy? Does that mean that I'm being affected in a negative or evil way?

No. My definition of dark fantasy is fantasy tinged with the reality of our world-only exaggerated and based upon the wild dreams and things that our wonderful imaginations concoct. It's a darker side to the Disney movies that we grew up with. I mean, in the real story of The Little Mermaid the mermaid dies. And doesn't Snow White dance to death?(Versions may vary, of course.) 

If you do not let the evil overcome or affect you, then it's okay.

Hun, don't side with Voldemort or the Ghouls from The Graveyard Book. They may seem intriguing because...well admit it, evil can be intriguing. As kids we are curious and scared at the same time of the villains in those same Disney movies. We want to know the unknown.
But over and over while reading and watching these sort of things, remind yourself clearly of what is good. And if you have a question or are confused as to who is good and who is bad, then I suggest questioning what you are immersing yourself into. 

In my opinion, if there is lasting doubt as to who is good and who is bad, the material is not right to indulge in. 

Also, we may want to sympathize with the villain. Pity is good. Pity is one of humanity's beautiful attributes, and some don't possess it in large amounts. . But do not pity the sinner because he may have an excuse to commit evil, or it is "who he is." There is no excuse for evil. God creates no evil.
Pity the corrupted being who doesn't look like he's doing so hot in the race to redemption.

As we get older, we have to make decisions for ourselves. Our dear mums and dads most likely won't be over our shoulders watching our choices in entertainment. That's why you have to make the choice to make a choice. Is what I'm using to entertain myself...good in the long run?

Again, ask yourself this not so simple question.

Who is good and who is bad? Is the evil being portrayed as good?

You may be also wondering about those sketchy characters that add plot twists and tidbits to the story. Take Severus Snape, the oily haired mystery from Harry Potter for example. I can't say I had no idea what side he was on. I had a feeling he would turn out okay...or more important to the story, y'know, more than just a bully. And in the end, *SPOILER SPOILER BEWARE BEWARE* he did turn out alright. He made bad choices but...he's human okay, give him a break. Yeesh Snape haters.

All in all, if you're  a Christian debating whether or not to go the fantasy route, in the end you're the judge, with God's guidance.


P.S. I do believe in fairies, I do, I do, but if you don't believe in fairies, who is to say they believe in you?  <To all the people who kill innocent fairies daily by saying they don't exist. *cough cough* my brothers. >

Have a nice day.






17 comments:

  1. I'm allowed to watch/read magical things like Narnia, The Hobbit/LOTR, Wildwood, etc etc etc as long as I know that it isn't real.
    I don't read/watch Harry Potter is because I don't really like wizard-y types of magic, but that's just me. ;}

    ~Lydia~ <3

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    1. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, and Narnia, The Hobbit, and others you mentioned are definitely stand outs in the fantasy world.: )
      ~Kathryn

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  2. often times i do in fact "pity" (or something along the lines of that) the villains portrayed in books (doesn't matter what genre, though there are a select few books in which i do not support the "villain" figure in any way), but only because i see them in a different way. i rarely ever like the protagonist of a book, in fact, most of the time i strongly dislike the protagonist and find them cocky and annoying. to me, "villains" in fantasy books are simply glorified versions of the reject kids, the "bad" kids, you know--the ones that everyone avoids at school, the ones that are deemed "emo" and "depressed" because of how they dress or what interests them. from what i see, the "heroes" in books are often portrayed as perfect, they have "flawless" personalities, which just makes me think of the stereotypical types of people--the "good" kids that everyone likes, the attractive ones, and the "bad" kids that no on cares about, that everyone's afraid of in one way or another. perhaps i'm just crazy, or maybe i have quite the imagination, but either way, i'm one that feels very strongly about assuming things about people and characters, thinking that they're one way or doing something just to hurt or bother others. i suppose that's why i feel the way i do about the villain figures in fantasy books and/or movies. to me, they're misunderstood. but like i said, there are a select few that i have absolutely no sympathy for.

    this comment is probably very irrelevant, sorry kathryn. don't feel obligated to respond or anything. i guess i just needed to get my thoughts out there. then again, i'm athiest--that just makes this comment even more irrelevant regarding this post. hmm. again, i apologize.

    -m

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    1. That's funny because I rarely see that anymore. In grade school I read the most disgusting books about perfect children...the books made me MAD. I think it made me uncomfortable to know that the author thought a perfect person existed. Now, the books I read are about realistic people-people who get mad, sad, and experience joy just like me. Nonetheless, I pity the villain-they won't have a chance to change, and people probably aren't helping.
      But in most cases, in the books I read anyway, the protaganist pities the villain. I mean, if you don't, you probably need to examine your morality. That's what I hate in a perfect protagonist-not looking at all sides.
      Thank you for your comment and I hope I didn't offend you.
      ~Kathryn

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    2. exactly--i strictly read realistic (and i mean *really* realistic, not just your average kid goes to school and does stuff book) fiction unless i have to read something else for something mandatory, like school.

      you certainly didn't offend me, i am simply one that talks a lot and likes to get their opinion out there.

      -maddie

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  3. I am having a fun summer photo contest over at my blog! to enter click here:
    http://a-girl-named-elly.blogspot.com/2015/07/a-girl-summer-photo-contest.html

    thanks!
    -elly <3

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  4. Agreed. Although I don't care for magic, I think it's okay to read books where the villain has magic. Because it shows that you can do anything, you don't have to be magical to overcome your villain.
    Also, I believe in fairies too :)
    ~Mads

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    1. Yes, fellow believer.
      ~Kathryn

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    2. Fairies are real. What do you think happened when you first laughed as a baby? pfft. xD Also, as a crusher on peter pan, it is very useful to be on the good side on Tink if you know what I mean. xD

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    3. Oh gosh you're hilarious. XD
      ~Kathryn

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  5. Well hey, I'm Catholic too! And I very much agree with you. My friend's parents wouldn't let her read Harry Potter because they don't like the whole magic concept, but in the end they did let her, and it's so worth it! Those books teach you so much about friendship, and making good choices, and I think those are very important lessons for kids to learn. And with fantasy, C. S. Lewis was Christian and the Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe has Christian concepts. Now I can see why parents wouldn't want their kids reading Twilight, but with books like Harry Potter, I think that they should be aloud to.
    ~Lady Claire

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    1. Personally, I don't like books that shove morals in your face-and that's why I enjoy Harry Potter for it's subtle and artful morals.
      That's cool that you're Catholic as well. : )
      ~Kathryn

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    2. if you like books with subtle morals/lessons, i highly suggest reading some of andrew smith's books, though you should ask your parents before reading them, as all of his books include swearing, and a lot of them include sexual content. however, they're lovely books with human characters (meaning that they all have their flaws and such) and meaningful plots.

      -m

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    3. Thanks for the suggestion!
      ~Kathryn

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  6. I'm a christian and my family was in a stage like that for like 20 years (this was before I existed :) and we weren't allowed to watch anime because my parents used to believe there were demons in it, :) we weren't allowed to read or watch harry potter, lord of the rings, the hobbit and so on. well a couple years have passed that things have finally changed, my brothers and sisters (and I) are now huge fans of lord of the rings, the hobbit, Harry Potter!!! and one of my brothers and my younger sister and I are in love with anime.

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    1. It definitely requires though!
      ~Kathryn

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  7. Very well put. I agree with you whole heartedly. :)

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Thank you for leaving a comment-you're the best!
~Kathryn

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